CFF™ and Technique

CFF™ uses Dr. Frederick Rossiter, M.D.’s technique* of contracting the muscles first and sliding across the skin as one of the main techniques for building an elegant and powerful face and neck with facial exercises. He says since the muscles go through the skin, allowing us to make facial expressions, when you contract the muscles and slide across the skin you not only build muscle fiber, but you tone the muscles at the same time. Plus, as the muscles tone and firm-up, they therefore take the skin up with them.

This has been a very successful technique that allows us to employ muscle resistance to build the muscles and create lift while stimulating the subcutaneous layers, including the fascia. This consequently not only allows us to control the look of the build we want, but it also allows us to get a very smooth and attractive shape to both the face and neck. Using this technique we are also challenging bone which helps to replace bone loss while preventing the bones of the face from deteriorating, as well.

Beginners

For beginners this technique can seem daunting. Am I stretching the skin? How much pressure should I use? How much should I contract? If you are under the age of thirty or still have a very firm face, it’s advised you start by lightly moisturizing your face and neck when first learning and performing the exercises. This will allow for less resistance and more toning to happen while at the same time imparting that elegant and balanced shape that is built into the combination of exercises that comprise CFF™.

For example, when first asked to contract the muscles, contract them lightly – not too strongly and increase the amount of force as you progress with the exercises. In other words, go slowly and carefully at first, checking the look of your face, being vigilant that your build is happening slowly and evenly. When you already have a firm face, you want to keep what you have and simply tone and lift that little bit that’s necessary.

As time goes by and you find you want more build, you can exert more pressure when contracting and try to exercise with less and less moisturizer to get more resistance as needed. More resistance results in more build. You should perform the exercises not more than twice or at most, depending upon your age and condition of your skin, etc… three times a week, spaced evenly throughout the week and only once a day.

When performing the Face Firmer, the same rule applies. Light contracting and a softer touch. When performing exercises around the eyes, all exercises should be performed again, with a light touch and less vigorous movement when exerting a “stretch”. This will allow toning and firming that is just right for your facial build. By the way, you cannot stretch the skin when contracting and working against resistance, so all the CFF™ exercises are safe to perform.

Intermediates and Veterans

It’s usually okay to have a heavier hand when first starting with the facial exercises, as you want more build than just only toning you get with the lighter touch. So, if you are older or you have sagging and wrinkling happening, once you have your foundational build usually by the third to sixth month, your skin and face can typically handle this more vigorous workout. You will be able to judge for yourself by then. Or, you may wish to stay with the light toning using moisturizer and a light touch. You are in control and you will know what’s best for you and your situation.

Once you’ve established your foundational build, you then check your face and neck to address particular parts of the face that seem to need a little more work in getting you to the place you want. This is when you can customize your workout with the bonus exercises, including using the “Rubbing Out the Wrinkles” technique. You simply add them at the end of your foundational workout along with the Face Firmer massage technique. This way you can get exactly the build you want and it will be elegant, powerful, firm and smooth.

Conclusion

You can achieve the amount of build you want on your face by adjusting your touch and/or using moisturizer when performing the facial exercises. Younger exercisers and those with firmer faces can start the exercises by using moisturizer and a lighter touch for toning to achieve a light build; or you can be more aggressive and perform the exercises on a drier face and exert more intense contractions when sliding, resulting in a more powerful build.

Once you’ve established the foundational build, you can customize by adding bonus exercises to achieve the look you want.

*Frederick M. Rossiter, M.D.: A professor of anatomy and physiology and author of the book, Face Culture, Pageant Press (Copyright 1956) (Out of Print)